Cabinet des Modes, 7e Cahier, 3e Planche

Posted by muhammad nasrudin



PLATE III.


It represents two Bergères of the most agreeable form.

The first, on the left, is in cannelé, chiné, and striped silk.
The wood, walnut, sculpted and gilded.

The second, on the right, is in cannelé, striped silk.
The wood, also walnut, sculpted and gilded.

 It is at the shop of M. BOUCHE the younger, no. 73, at the Gold eagle, rue de la Verrerie, in Paris, that the objects described in the two last Plates are found, as well as all the Furniture of the newest taste.
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Jewels of the most distinguished taste, which are found at the shop of M. Grancher, at the Shop of the Little Dunkirk, quai de Conti, near the Pont-Neuf, in Paris.

Ring, with a bouquet composed of little diamonds on blue composition.
Bracelets with gold plaquettes, fashionable, with little caskets.
Candy boxes in artificial crystal, decorated with gold and enamel.
Flat watch, in gold, enameled in the style of a Peacock's tail: face two inches in diameter, Arabic numerals ranged regularly.
Arrows in diamond to fasten kerchiefs: monograms are made for the same purpose.
Silver sword, inlaid with gold, trimmed with stones from Cayenne.
Scissors with steel arms, decorated with gold, silver, and the same stones.
Large Seal with two faces, trimmed with fine pearls.
Workbags, in boat shape, called à l'Anglaise.
Embroidered garters, with springs, imitating the English.
Purse of silk net, very fine, spotted with tamboured flowers, trimmed with drawstrings and fringe in steel beads. There are some trimmed with drawstrings and gold fringe.
False Watch with two enameled faces; one side serving as a barometer, and the other as a compass, very-accurate.
Punchbowl, in painted and varnished metal, silvered inside.
Polished steel button, with monograms, engraved.
Other of steel encrusted with gold in relief, of diverse colors; a type of very-precious jewels, which produces the greatest effect: the steel being hardened, it is protected from rust.
This Novelty, which is adopted in all sorts of Works of Jewelry, is made in the Workshop of M. Grancher, in Clignancourt.
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A very fashionable amusement of society is to make impromptu Songs. Many people think that to possess this talent, one must be nothing less than a Poet; however almost everyone can acquire it, and even exercise it with success; it suffices to know the rules of versifying, which take two or three hours of study; to have then in one's memory a certain number of Passe-partouts, that is to say, general Couplets, which agree, so to speak, through addition or subtraction of some words, with all names and all states.

With this provision, one tries to give rise, in Company, to the occasion of speaking of the art of improvisation, and to be asked for some couplets. It is not necessary to anticipate, nor to fear letting some little negligences in one's songs escape; they lead to the belief in Listeners, that one is really improvising: with assurance, one can even persuade them that one has received from Nature this marvellous talent to a supreme degree.

We will give next, as objects of fashion, some samples of Passe-partout which are the subject here.
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PASSE-PARTOUT,
Serving to extemporize an erotic Song for such a young Person that one judges to be relevant, on the tune: Play my Musette.


First line. It varies according to the necessity of the rhyme:
1. One hundred times I repeat it,
2. For a long time I have burned,
3. I say what I think,
4. I say without flattery,
5. I speak with frankness,
6. Hot as a furnace,
7. I am never false,
8. Everyone guesses,
9. My heart loves its chain,
10. I lose the Tramontane,

Second line, which varies according to the name of the Person.
1. I adore my Annette, - my Suzette, etc.
2. I adore my Ursule,
3. I cherish my Hortense, - my Constance, etc.
4. How I love Rosalie, - my Julie, etc.
5. And I love my Louise, - Denise, etc.
6. I adore my Thérèse,
7. I adore Adelaide,
8. How I cherish Justine, - Christine, etc.
9. And I love Madeleine, - my Hélène, etc.
10. When I see Marianne, - my Suzanne, etc.

The 3rd and 4th lines never vary.
In reining over my heart,
She makes my well-being.

(This is the first Couplet.)

The other Couplets can be sung in the following manner, according to whether the Person is blonde or brunette.

Second Couplet.

Let's celebrate this Blonde/Let's sing of this Brunette,
And the Echo responds/repeats.
Without a doubt it is infatuated
With the name I cherish.

Third Couplet.

My Song, beautiful Blonde/my Brunette,
Will please everyone/Will never be made,
If I celebrate in verse,
All your diverse talents.
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Note. One sees that each first line of the first Couplet, corresponds, by its number, with each second line of the same Couplet.

Example.

1. A hundred times I repeat,
1. I adore my Annette.
In reigning over my heart,
She makes my well-being.

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More Passe-Partouts, in the next No.
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The Cabinet des Modes being expanded into all the Provinces, as well as in foreign Countries, we invite Admirers, Artists, Artisans, Makers, and Manufacturers, to give notice to M. ALLEMAND, the house of M. Piot, Wine Merchant, rue Saint Marguerite, in the suburb of Saint Germain, in Paris, of everything they invent or perfect, in both Dress and Parures for one or the other sex, and in the Furniture of every type, Decorations, Embellishments for rooms, Carriage shape, Jewels, Works of Goldsmithy, and generally in all objects of use, convenience, Fashion, or agreeableness.

In having care to frank Letters and Packets, one can also send Notices and exact Descriptions to the same address, with Designs and Plans which could be necessary for publishing them, to make known their merit or agreeableness, and to facilitate all the advantages that are wanted to explain them.